Press Box

Press Releases
Velocity Sports Performance Expands Presence in Southeast By Keith Walker
September 10, 2013
-- New multi-use facility in Madison, MS becomes regional flagship. --

COSTA MESA, Calif., Sept. 10, 2013 – Velocity Sports Performance has partnered with Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center and Mississippi Baptist Health Systems in the new Madison Healthplex Performance Center. The facility is approximately 96,000 square feet and located on the 90-acre Baptist Madison Campus. It’s scheduled to open late in the fourth quarter of 2013.

At the Madison Healthplex Performance Center, Velocity will provide its sports performance services and solutions to a variety of athletes and adults in group, team, and private settings. High school, college, professional, and endurance athletes will benefit from Velocity’s elite training programs and experienced coaches.

“We’re tremendously excited to be involved in this impressive, world-class facility,” said Peter Barbaresi, president and CEO of Velocity. “Integrating our sports performance solutions with Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center and Baptist’s existing medical, physical therapy, orthopaedic, and nutritional programs also advances our High Performance model for athletes who require and demand a complete training experience.”

The features of the performance center include a fitness floor with cardio equipment, indoor and outdoor tracks and turf fields, a weight training area, and locker rooms.

“A partnership like this between Baptist, Mississippi Sports Medicine and now Velocity creates a facility offering services unlike any other offered in this market,” said David Carpenter, Executive Director at the Madison Healthplex Performance Center.

In addition to Velocity’s presence in the new Madison facility, the partnership also includes the implementation of Velocity sports performance training services inside Baptist Health Systems’ existing healthplex centers in the cities of Clinton and Jackson.

“Expanding this partnership to our other facilities enables Baptist to provide this unique sports performance training to these areas without having to travel too far,” Carpenter said. “We anticipate that this will be a huge value-add to our members.”

About Velocity Sports Performance

Velocity Sports Performance (www.velocitysp.com) is the premiere athletic performance training organization in North America. For more than 14 years, Velocity has helped hundreds of thousands of athletes maximize their athletic potential. Velocity helps athletes achieve their goals by developing strength, power, coordination, agility, speed, flexibility, and energy systems with an additional focus on injury prevention, recovery/regeneration, and nutrition. There are nearly 40 Velocity training facilities across the United States.

About Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center

Founded in 1984 Mississippi Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Center (www.msmoc.com) was Mississippi's first full-service orthopaedic specialty practice and remains the states leading provider of orthopaedic care today. Each of our experienced physicians is board certified and fellowship trained. Our upper extremity, lower extremity, total joint and spine specialist perform procedures of the neck and back, shoulder, elbow, hand, hip, knee and foot. In addition to our physicians, Mississippi Sports Medicine has one the highest rated sports medicine fellowships available in the United States, having trained over 75 Orthopaedic Physicians worldwide. We are also heavily involved with our community providing outreach athletic training services to high schools across the state and offering complimentary sports screenings to over 5000 athletes each year.

About Baptist Health Systems

Baptist Health Systems (www.mbhs.org) in Jackson, Miss. is the parent company of Baptist Medical Center, The Mississippi Hospital for Restorative Care, Baptist Medical Center Leake in Carthage, Miss. and a number of related healthcare services and programs. For over 100 years, Baptist has served Mississippi and the surrounding states as a Christian-based, non-profit comprehensive medical center. In 2013, HealthGrades, America’s leading independent healthcare ratings organization, named Baptist Medical Center as one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for general surgery, orthopedic surgery, joint replacement, prostatectomy and gastrointestinal care.

Velocity Sports Performance Expands In Texas By Opening New Center In Spring, TX By Velocity Sports Performance
September 03, 2013
Spring, TX - Velocity Sports Performance, specializing in advanced sports performance training for athletes of all ages and skill levels, today announced the grand opening of its newest location in Sping, TX. Located at 2733 Rayford Road, Spring, TX. Velocity Sports Performance is the leader in sports performance training around the nation . The state of Texas has 6 current locations with more opening in the future.

The 65,000 square foot facility includes six volleyball courts, eight batting cages and a personal training studio. Clients can take advantage of dedicated adult fitness classes and specialized equipment, which includes a computerized analysis of their athleticism and progress.
 
"I'm thrilled to bring a Velocity Sports Performance training center to Spring said Greg Centilli, being a son of a Texas High School Football coach  and also Playing and Coaching  Div 1 football  Centilli knows the importance of  athletics in Texas . I have a  passion for sports and for the athletes of the great state of Texas. Velocity Sports Performance  will make a  huge difference in your  kids lives. And help them excel at all their sports.
 
Velocity Sports Performance defines sports performance training and has built a business devoted to training athletes in every sport, at all ages and all skill levels.  Athletes of any caliber can realize their potential through advanced training programs, scientifically designed to maximize human sports performance.  Velocity Sports Performance offers athletes from age Six through adult, semi-private and team-based sports performance training designed to help them increase speed, power and agility, while reducing the risk of sports-related injuries.

At Velocity Sports Performance, only the best coaches are hired. Velocity Sports Performance requires its coaches to have a Bachelor's degree in Exercise Science or a related field,  Many of the coaches also have masters degrees and college coaching credentials . Additionally, training in small groups allows more personal one-on-one attention between coach and athlete, which ensures that each athlete will be able to get the instructions they need in order to improve.

Velocity Sports Performance enjoys strategic relationships with nationally respected organizations such as Under Armour and Gatorade. The company also offers worldwide franchise opportunities and provides world-class franchise training and ongoing support.
 
Until now, there was an undeserved market in this area in terms of age-appropriate performance training for younger athletes. Centilli said. "It used to be that sports performance training programs were only available to professional and collegiate athletes, but today athletes start training earlier and preparing to realize their dreams of playing elite sports. Velocity Sports Performance programs are specifically designed to give kids a foundation for reaching their greatest athletic potential in a safe and supervised environment, while putting the 'fun' back into their activities.  Meanwhile, parents will see their kids self-confidence grow."

Experienced, Quality Leader
Greg Centilli graduated from East Texas State with Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology. Centilli grew up and played Texas High school  before going on the Play and  Coach at every level of  Football.  His playing stops include San Jose State , East Texas State and  stents oversees playing in Italy and Sweden,  His coaching stops has included Giddings Texas, Dodge City Community College and The University of Houston   Centilli has a well-rounded past that shows his determination for success, gaining valuable experience working within collaborative environments where teamwork was critical.  He is interested in sports and human development, and possesses skills and abilities to help clients wishes come true.
 
Injury Prevention
Three million youths suffer sports related injuries annually, 25% of which require emergency room visits, according to the American Society of Pediatric Medicine.   It is important for all athletes, especially youth athletes, to receive training in order to keep them safe on the field, improve their abilities, and still have fun playing sports.
 
The level of competition in sports, particularly youth sports, has dramatically increased in recent years and training is important for both maximum performance and injury prevention, says Centilli, Sports Performance Director. Our program addresses performance improvement, life-long fitness, injury prevention and love of sports. We bring expertise in proper strength and conditioning techniques to lower the risk of injury and enhance athletic performance for pros and student athletes alike.
Science-based Training
Velocity Sports Performance's scientifically-based training is designed to improve the athletic ability of all age groups, genders and athletic skill levels:
  • Student Athletes, ages6 to 18
  • Recreational Adult Athletes
  • Elite Amateur Athletes
  • Professional Athletes
  • Occupational Athletes (Firefighters, Police Officers, Military, etc.)
The center also offers a specialized program:
  • Velocity Sports Performance Adult Fitness, an adult targeted program, which delivers fast-paced, high-energy workouts structured for total body conditioning no matter the participant's age or fitness level.  Throughout the program, strength, cardio and flexibility tests are used to gauge progress.  Every Velocity Sports Performance Adult Fitness workout includes: Active Dynamic Warm-up, Energy System Development and Strength Training.

Athletes typically train two to three times a week, in groups no larger than ten  athletes per coach, so that clients receive individualized coaching and personal attention.  The athletes are grouped by age and skill level to best motivate and encourage training at optimal levels. For more information or to set up your free trial session, call (281) 863-9407 or visit the local Velocity Sports Performance center at 2733 Rayford Road, Spring, TX.

About Velocity Sports Performance
Velocity Sports Performance (www.velocitysp.com) is the premiere athletic performance training organization in North America. For more than 14 years, Velocity has helped hundreds of thousands of athletes maximize their athletic potential. Velocity helps athletes achieve their goals by developing strength, power, coordination, agility, speed, flexibility, and energy systems with an additional focus on injury prevention, recovery/regeneration, and nutrition. There are more than 40 Velocity training facilities across the United States.

2013 NFL Draft Decisions Include Dozens of Velocity-Supported Athletes By Keith Walker
May 01, 2013
 

-- High Performance Program helps 17 players get drafted and others signed as free agents --

COSTA MESA, Calif., May 1, 2013 Elite college football athletes who were supported and trained by Velocity Sports Performance leading up to the NFL Combine and Pro Days were heavily involved in the action at the 2013 NFL Draft.

Overall, Velocity trained 17 players selected during the three-day draft and another group of free-agent signees.

Training at Velocity has been great, said Kenny Vaccaro, the 15th overall pick by the New Orleans Saints, while preparing for the NFL Combine. They've been helping me with a lot of different things with my game. I thought it was going to be the best place for me. I got to get away from Texas and just kind of get in the zone out in California.

Watch Vaccaro as he prepares with Velocity for his big day at http://www.stack.com/2013/04/12/kenny-vaccaro/

Velocity athletes selected in the 2013 NFL Draft include:

ROUND 1

#15 Kenny Vaccaro, SS, University of Texas - New Orleans Saints
#29 Cordarrelle Patterson, WR, University of Tennessee - Minnesota Vikings
#31 Travis Frederick, C, University of Wisconsin - Dallas Cowboys

ROUND 2

#41 Robert Woods, WR, USC - Buffalo Bills

ROUND 3

#71 T.J. McDonald, FS, USC - St. Louis Rams
#73 Mike Glennon, QB, North Carolina St. - Tampa Bay Buccaneers
#81 Damontre Moore, DE, Texas A&M - New York Giants

ROUND 4

#103 Alex Okafor, DE, University of Texas - Arizona Cardinals
#104 Jelani Jenkins, OLB, University of Florida - Miami Dolphins
#109 David Bakhtiari, OT, University of Colorado - Green Bay Packers
#121 Khaled Holmes, C, USC - Indianapolis Colts

ROUND 5

#139 Montori Hughes, DT, Tennessee-Martin - Indianapolis Colts
#155 Jeff Locke, P, UCLA - Minnesota Vikings
#162 Brandon Jenkins, DE, Florida St. - Washington Redskins
#168 Ricky Wagner, OT, University of Wisconsin - Baltimore Ravens

ROUND 6

#208 Jeremy Harris, CB, New Mexico St. - Jacksonville Jaguars
#212 Joe Kruger, DE, University of Utah - Philadelphia Eagles

Undrafted Free Agents Signed

Jordan Rodgers, QB, Vanderbilt University - Jacksonville Jaguars
Joseph Fauria, TE, UCLA - Detroit Lions
Braxston Cave, C, Notre Dame - Cleveland Browns
Da'Rick Rogers, WR, Tennessee Tech - Buffalo Bills
Phillip Lutzenkirchen, TE, Auburn University - St. Louis Rams
Dave Kruger, DT, University of Utah - Cleveland Browns
Ryan McMahon, DB, Sacramento St. - Green Bay Packers
Deonte Williams, SB, Cal Poly - Oakland Raiders

Velocity's 2013 NFL Pre-Draft High Performance Program took place in multiple training facilities. While preparing for the NFL Combine and their Pro Day, more than 30 elite football athletes experienced daily speed, power, and strength sessions, along with personalized nutrition, physical therapy, and recovery services, position-specific skill training, mental training, and NFL Combine-specific preparations for team interviews.

The majority of this year's stellar draft class trained under Velocity High Performance Director Ken Vick in the state-of-the art Velocity facility in Irvine, Calif. Each draft selection who trained exclusively in Irvine is represented by Athletes First, the premiere professional football agency that is headquartered in Irvine.

It's been great being here with some good receivers and DBs, said first-round pick Cordarrelle Patterson during training. Every day we come out and compete and just get each other better. He (Vick) is always looking at the little things to get you better. 

Watch how Patterson prepares for his transition to the NFL at http://www.stack.com/video/2270175318001/Path-to-the-Pros-2013-Cordarrelle-Patterson/

Velocity supported five first-round selections in the 2012 NFL Draft, including the #4 overall pick, Matt Kalil (USC, Minnesota Vikings), #13 Michael Floyd (Notre Dame, Arizona Cardinals), #18 Melvin Ingram (South Carolina, San Diego Chargers), #29 Harrison Smith (Notre Dame, Minnesota Vikings), and #31 Doug Martin (Boise State, Tampa Bay Buccaneers). Overall, Velocity trained 16 athletes selected during the three-day 2012 NFL Draft and more than 30 free-agent signees.

This year's athletes also join a prestigious group of current NFL players who previously trained for the NFL Draft with Velocity, including Von Miller (Denver Broncos, 2011), Jake Locker (Tennessee Titans, 2011), Colt McCoy (Cleveland Browns, 2010), Mark Sanchez (New York Jets, 2009), Clay Matthews (Green Bay Packers, 2009), and BJ Raji (Green Bay Packers, 2009), to name just a few.

About Velocity Sports Performance

Velocity Sports Performance (www.velocitysp.com) is the premiere athletic performance training organization in North America. For more than 14 years, Velocity has helped hundreds of thousands of athletes maximize their athletic potential. Velocity helps athletes achieve their goals by developing strength, power, coordination, agility, speed, flexibility, and energy systems with an additional focus on injury prevention, recovery/regeneration, and nutrition. There are nearly 40 Velocity training facilities across the United States.

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Articles
A Look Inside a Leading NFL Combine Training Program By Keith Walker
February 07, 2013
 
Ken Vick, Velocity's VP High Performance, has been preparing elite football athletes for the NFL Combine and Pro Days for more than a decade, including 20+ first-round NFL Draft selections during that time.

Vick is currently directing the daily activities and preparation of 20+ athletes who are invited to this year's NFL Combine, including first-round projections Damontre Moore (DE, Texas A&M), Cordarrelle Patterson (WR, Tennessee), Kenny Vaccaro (S, Texas), and Mike Glennon (QB, NC State), in addition to numerous other potential NFL Draft picks.

QUESTION: Describe the process and athlete experience during the first few weeks of the program as these players begin preparing for the NFL Combine and Draft.

KEN VICK: Entering NFL Combine training is a big change for many athletes. First of all, they are no longer college students and as professionals, they have to start thinking like a business person as well as an athlete. We want them to start thinking strategically about the risk-to-benefit ratio and the cost of every decision they make. So at this point, instead of a coach telling them what to do, our coaches are guiding them, getting their input, and helping them to think about how to make decisions in their training and preparation.

The training is also very different as we prepare them for the NFL Combine. While the off-season in football is generally longer with a steady progression to training, this process is very short and intense. We have to very quickly load the athlete so that his body will peak for their key events like the Combine, the pro days, and even the early all-star bowl games. It's also a shock to the system because they're coming directly out of season and entering right back into full training. This is where the integration of sports medicine becomes very important. We can't just rehab and wait for them to feel good to begin training, but on the other hand, we can't just train and ignore the many bumps, bruises and injuries that they experienced during the college football season. This is also the time when we begin educating them on the risk factors that will affect their career longevity.

Another difference as these college athletes enter NFL Draft preparation is that they are now surrounded by many other elite, high-level athletes. This is their first taste of understanding that as a process to the NFL, everyone around them will play at a higher level. Their talent is no longer enough to just get by. I often say that talent is just the cover charge to get in the door. After that, it's up to you to do something more.

QUESTION: What are the main things you and your team of high performance coaches focus on during the program?

KEN VICK: Everything now revolves around creating the best possible programs for each individual athlete. We don't fit players into a preset program. We create a program to fit our players.

I think one of the very important factors that get overlooked in many training programs is basic communication. Day 1 begins by sitting down with the athlete and discussing his background, his goals, the way he sees himself as an athlete, and the way he wants to see his career unfold. We involve the agents and also gather feedback from NFL team scouts in an effort to understand how to put together an individual plan. Then we take our team of experts and look at the input from each of them to create a plan that is going to get the optimal results for each player in the timeframe we have to work with them.

One top priority of Combine training is getting the athlete as healthy as possible in a very short amount of time. Integrating all of our sports medicine experts, physical therapists, soft tissue specialists, nutritionists and physicians all play a role in getting our players healthy and functional again. This is critical because they have to train to improve their performance and because the medical evaluations are a very important factor at the NFL Combine. Another very important priority is not just the intensity of the training, but the specificity and the focus of the recovery. While training is the stimulus, it's during recovery that the body and brain adapt. So if we want the athlete to improve and to be able to handle more intense training, we have to implement a very intensive and specific regeneration plan. Regeneration has become a popular topic, but too many people still generalize in what they are doing. We look at four different types of stress on the body and break down a regeneration plan around those stresses.

QUESTION: Walk us through a typical day for these elite athletes right now as they prepare for the NFL Combine and other key evaluation events.

KEN VICK: Because we have such a short timeframe, our days have many objectives and a lot of things to get done. The players begin by eating a breakfast of custom food based on their nutritional needs and their individual tastes. Many will arrive before the first training session for therapy or other types of preparation. The first session each morning is focused on movement and depending on the day, will either be linear speed (working on acceleration and maximum velocity) or will be multi-directional (working on quickness, agility, and foot work). The movement training typically lasts 60-90 minutes, with a section for dynamic warm-up focused on the technical aspects of movement and then some apply drills to really stimulate optimal motor learning.

The athletes then go to position work, working on the specific skills with position coaches. They have a custom post-workout drink designed to meet the carbohydrate, protein, and other specific needs of each individual. Depending on the athlete, they may have more therapy or post-workout treatments on that day. Some may have an aquatic workout as well, and then lunch before the afternoon strength and power session.

In the afternoon, we focus on various aspects of strength and power development. This involves plyometrics, weight room, additional stretching, and conditioning. Again, they have a pre-workout drink designed to prepare them and minimize fatigue, and then also a post-workout drink to refuel their body and prepare them for the next workout. The regeneration process starts immediately and they go through various modalities to help the body adapt and recover for the next workout. This includes things like ice baths, showers, Normatec and Marc Pro recovery solutions. They will also review video of their training during a meeting with coaches, and be in a classroom to learn schemes and tactics on the field. Their day also includes additional stretching, soft tissue work, and physical therapy, when necessary.

QUESTION: These elite athletes quickly transition from college students across the U.S. to preparing full-time in Southern California for their first professional job and career. What have your observations been so far in terms of how they successfully manage this life change?

KEN VICK: This is an amazing group of athletes and really good young men who we have with us. It's always a challenge to leave a structured college environment and become a professional athlete, even more so in the spotlight, but with new stresses and demands in a very short amount of time. It's a great opportunity to work with these young men to help them take the outlook of being a professional to that of being the CEO of their company. Now they have to make decisions about what they will do.
 
Ken Vick, Velocity's VP High Performance, has been preparing elite football athletes for the NFL Combine and Pro Days for more than a decade, including 20+ first-round NFL Draft selections during that time.

Vick is currently directing the daily activities and preparation of 20+ athletes who are invited to this year's NFL Combine, including first-round projections Damontre Moore (DE, Texas A&M), Cordarrelle Patterson (WR, Tennessee), Kenny Vaccaro (S, Texas), and Mike Glennon (QB, NC State), in addition to numerous other potential NFL Draft picks.

QUESTION: Describe the process and athlete experience during the first few weeks of the program as these players begin preparing for the NFL Combine and Draft.

KEN VICK: Entering NFL Combine training is a big change for many athletes. First of all, they are no longer college students and as professionals, they have to start thinking like a business person as well as an athlete. We want them to start thinking strategically about the risk-to-benefit ratio and the cost of every decision they make. So at this point, instead of a coach telling them what to do, our coaches are guiding them, getting their input, and helping them to think about how to make decisions in their training and preparation.

The training is also very different as we prepare them for the NFL Combine. While the off-season in football is generally longer with a steady progression to training, this process is very short and intense. We have to very quickly load the athlete so that his body will peak for their key events like the Combine, the pro days, and even the early all-star bowl games. It's also a shock to the system because they're coming directly out of season and entering right back into full training. This is where the integration of sports medicine becomes very important. We can't just rehab and wait for them to feel good to begin training, but on the other hand, we can't just train and ignore the many bumps, bruises and injuries that they experienced during the college football season. This is also the time when we begin educating them on the risk factors that will affect their career longevity.

Another difference as these college athletes enter NFL Draft preparation is that they are now surrounded by many other elite, high-level athletes. This is their first taste of understanding that as a process to the NFL, everyone around them will play at a higher level. Their talent is no longer enough to just get by. I often say that talent is just the cover charge to get in the door. After that, it's up to you to do something more.

QUESTION: What are the main things you and your team of high performance coaches focus on during the program?

KEN VICK: Everything now revolves around creating the best possible programs for each individual athlete. We don't fit players into a preset program. We create a program to fit our players.

I think one of the very important factors that get overlooked in many training programs is basic communication. Day 1 begins by sitting down with the athlete and discussing his background, his goals, the way he sees himself as an athlete, and the way he wants to see his career unfold. We involve the agents and also gather feedback from NFL team scouts in an effort to understand how to put together an individual plan. Then we take our team of experts and look at the input from each of them to create a plan that is going to get the optimal results for each player in the timeframe we have to work with them.

One top priority of Combine training is getting the athlete as healthy as possible in a very short amount of time. Integrating all of our sports medicine experts, physical therapists, soft tissue specialists, nutritionists and physicians all play a role in getting our players healthy and functional again. This is critical because they have to train to improve their performance and because the medical evaluations are a very important factor at the NFL Combine. Another very important priority is not just the intensity of the training, but the specificity and the focus of the recovery. While training is the stimulus, it's during recovery that the body and brain adapt. So if we want the athlete to improve and to be able to handle more intense training, we have to implement a very intensive and specific regeneration plan. Regeneration has become a popular topic, but too many people still generalize in what they are doing. We look at four different types of stress on the body and break down a regeneration plan around those stresses.

QUESTION: Walk us through a typical day for these elite athletes right now as they prepare for the NFL Combine and other key evaluation events.

KEN VICK: Because we have such a short timeframe, our days have many objectives and a lot of things to get done. The players begin by eating a breakfast of custom food based on their nutritional needs and their individual tastes. Many will arrive before the first training session for therapy or other types of preparation. The first session each morning is focused on movement and depending on the day, will either be linear speed (working on acceleration and maximum velocity) or will be multi-directional (working on quickness, agility, and foot work). The movement training typically lasts 60-90 minutes, with a section for dynamic warm-up focused on the technical aspects of movement and then some apply drills to really stimulate optimal motor learning.

The athletes then go to position work, working on the specific skills with position coaches. They have a custom post-workout drink designed to meet the carbohydrate, protein, and other specific needs of each individual. Depending on the athlete, they may have more therapy or post-workout treatments on that day. Some may have an aquatic workout as well, and then lunch before the afternoon strength and power session.

In the afternoon, we focus on various aspects of strength and power development. This involves plyometrics, weight room, additional stretching, and conditioning. Again, they have a pre-workout drink designed to prepare them and minimize fatigue, and then also a post-workout drink to refuel their body and prepare them for the next workout. The regeneration process starts immediately and they go through various modalities to help the body adapt and recover for the next workout. This includes things like ice baths, showers, Normatec and Marc Pro recovery solutions. They will also review video of their training during a meeting with coaches, and be in a classroom to learn schemes and tactics on the field. Their day also includes additional stretching, soft tissue work, and physical therapy, when necessary.

QUESTION: These elite athletes quickly transition from college students across the U.S. to preparing full-time in Southern California for their first professional job and career. What have your observations been so far in terms of how they successfully manage this life change?

KEN VICK: This is an amazing group of athletes and really good young men who we have with us. It's always a challenge to leave a structured college environment and become a professional athlete, even more so in the spotlight, but with new stresses and demands in a very short amount of time. It's a great opportunity to work with these young men to help them take the outlook of being a professional to that of being the CEO of their company. Now they have to make decisions about what they will do. What's key is that they have to learn to ask questions and seek out guidance regarding what the cost and benefit of each of those decisions are. They have to develop the mental focus and the grit to be able to do the little details that are not exciting, but that pay dividends and speak of professionalism. Some of my most exciting moments are when we give the choice to the athlete of what passes they are going to take. We give them the feedback, the benefits, and the cost, and it's so rewarding to see when they are willing to sacrifice the short-term so that they can give it their best effort and get focused on long-term success.

What's key is that they have to learn to ask questions and seek out guidance regarding what the cost and benefit of each of those decisions are. They have to develop the mental focus and the grit to be able to do the little details that are not exciting, but that pay dividends and speak of professionalism. Some of my most exciting moments are when we give the choice to the athlete of what passes they are going to take. We give them the feedback, the benefits, and the cost, and it's so rewarding to see when they are willing to sacrifice the short-term so that they can give it their best effort and get focused on long-term success.

Velocity Coach Trains Olympic Cyclists in Colorado Springs By Keith Walker
June 26, 2012
 
Velocity’s High Performance Director Ken Vick is at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs to help train two cyclists bound for London next month. USA Cycling’s Jimmy Watkins, a 29-year-old full-time firefighter from Bakersfield, Calif. who took up competitive cycling at age 21, qualified for the 2012 Olympics earlier this month. 21-year old Njisane Phillip will represent his home country of Trinidad & Tobago in London.

The two Olympians trained extensively with Coach Vick and his Velocity staff in Southern California before moving to the high-altitude training environment in Colorado this week. Watkins and Phillip will continue to train at the Olympic Training Center before departing for England next month. It is the first Olympics for both cyclists.
VIDEO: Velocity Prepares USA Track Star Allyson Felix for Olympics By Keith Walker
June 05, 2012
 
USA Track & Field star Allyson Felix, who competes in the 200 and 400 meter events, is gearing up for this summer's London Olympics by training at Velocity Sports Performance in West LA. Check out this brief video which includes comments from Sports Performance Director Andre Woodert on how he pushes Felix to her professional limit. The video is produced by Velocity national partner Gatorade as part of its "Inside the Edge" series. Watch the video here.

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